Animal control changes


By Kasie Strickland - kstrickland@civitasmedia.com



With a first reading to begin a pilot program for adoptions passed by council, dogs and cats in the custody of Pickens County Animal Control are one step closer to finding homes.


Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

The officers of the now fully staffed animal control attended training at the National Animal Control and Humane Officer Academy to obtain certifications in Animal Control and Cruelty Investigations.


Courtesy photo

PICKENS COUNTY — Dogs and cats in the custody of Pickens County Animal Control are one step closer to finding homes thanks to a proposed amendment that would allow for adoptions.

Currently, the facility responds to calls and takes in strays but has no program in place to facilitate people who may be looking for a new pet.

“This is going to change our existing animal control ordinance to allow us to set up a pilot program where we can actually adopt animals out,” said Roy Costner, chairman of Pickens County Council.

The motion was unanimously passed but would still have to pass two more readings before any changes could be implemented.

Currently, a number of the dogs and cats at animal control fall under the care of All Dogs Of Pickens Transport (A.D.O.P.T.), a non-profit organization that transports the animals to more populated areas, like Washington, D.C., for adoptions.

A.D.O.P.T. officials estimate their rescue program had reduced the euthanasia rate by 55 percent.

In addition to considering adding adoptions, other changes have come to the animal control facility as well, including the hire of Robert Kelley as the new director.

“With this new leadership, many positive procedural changes are being implemented,” said a county spokesperson.

The officers of the now fully staffed animal control also attended training at the National Animal Control and Humane Officer Academy to obtain certifications in Animal Control and Cruelty Investigations.

“This will provide the skills and knowledge needed to keep the officers, animals, and citizens safe,” said officials. “In addition, officers have been issued new professional uniforms so they are easy to identify.”

Repairs and upgrades have also been underway to the Animal Control facility and inmates from the adjacent Pickens County Prison have been utilized for feeding and watering the animals.

With a first reading to begin a pilot program for adoptions passed by council, dogs and cats in the custody of Pickens County Animal Control are one step closer to finding homes.
http://www.sentinelprogress.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/web1_12.jpgWith a first reading to begin a pilot program for adoptions passed by council, dogs and cats in the custody of Pickens County Animal Control are one step closer to finding homes. Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

The officers of the now fully staffed animal control attended training at the National Animal Control and Humane Officer Academy to obtain certifications in Animal Control and Cruelty Investigations.
http://www.sentinelprogress.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/web1_13.jpgThe officers of the now fully staffed animal control attended training at the National Animal Control and Humane Officer Academy to obtain certifications in Animal Control and Cruelty Investigations. Courtesy photo

By Kasie Strickland

kstrickland@civitasmedia.com

Reach Kasie Strickland at 864-855-0355.

Reach Kasie Strickland at 864-855-0355.

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